Category Archives: Holidays

Happy Thanksgiving…Unless You’re a Turkey!

What’s not to like about Thanksgiving?  It’s a long weekend, the weather is usually wonderful, and the tradition is to celebrate with good food, family and friends.  Plus, there’s not the pressure of gift-giving that can accompany other celebrations.

However, if you’re a turkey, Thanksgiving isn’t a favourite time of year!  According to this site published by the turkey farmers of Canada: Canadians purchased 2.2 million whole turkeys for Thanksgiving 2017. That’s 31% of all the whole turkeys that were sold over the year.

So, if you’re a human…I wish you a restful Thanksgiving weekend.  If you’re a turkey…RUN!!!

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The Importance of Gratitude

For Canadians, next weekend is Thanksgiving–a time to get together with family and friends, eat copious amounts of food and think about what/who we are thankful for. While as a culture we have set aside Thanksgiving to be a time of gratitude, I suggest that gratitude is something we should be aware of daily.

What is Gratitude?

One of my recent, favourite books is The Book of Joy:  Lasting Happiness in a Changing World, written by Douglas Abrams.  In April 2015, Archbishop Tutu and His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama spent five days together in Dharamsala, India, to celebrate the Dalai Lama’s 80th birthday and to discuss, in detail, their thoughts on joy (it’s nature, components, and the obstacles to experiencing it).  The details of these conversations were chronicled by Abrams and compiled into this book.

How do these esteemed spiritual leaders define gratitude?

“Gratitude is the recognition of all that holds us in the web of life and all that has made it possible to have the life that we have and the moment we are experiencing.  Thanksgiving is a natural response to life and may be the only way to savour it.”

While gratitude may be a natural response to life, our experiences aren’t always positive.  What about thankfulness when life is difficult?

Gratitude When The Going Gets Rough

The opening sentences in M. Scott Peck’s classic book The Road Less Traveled is:  “Life is difficult.  This is a great truth.  One of the greatest truths.”  We know this.  As humans, we experience grief, loss, stress, sickness, anger, anxiety. Our fellow humans disappoint us, or we disappoint ourselves.  “Life is difficult.”

However, what if there are seams of light, threaded throughout the difficulty? If we can trust that they are there, thankfulness helps us to recognize these glimmers in the dark.

Why Practice Gratitude?

As human beings it’s easy to get stuck in the “full catastrophe”of our lives–the good, the bad and the ugly. It’s often hard to look up from our challenges, and it’s easy to take our good fortune for granted.  As Joni Mitchell famously sang in Big Yellow Taxi, “You don’t know what you’ve got ’till it’s gone”.  That’s why it’s important that we focus and be grateful for what is in our lives in this moment.

Abrams writes:

“Both Christian and Buddhist traditions, perhaps all spiritual traditions, recognize the importance of gratefulness.  It allows us to shift our perspective, as the Dalai Lama and the Archbishop counseled, toward all we have been given and all that we have.  It moves us away from the narrow-minded focus on fault and lack and to the wider perspective of benefit and abundance.”

The magic of gratitude comes from this shift in perspective.  When we are grateful, the glass is no longer half empty, but half full.

When I work with individuals who are coping with challenges, we often explore their history for times when they have survived and grown from past difficulties.  As we look at what they learned and the resiliency gained from this experiences, they may feel thankful.  While they wouldn’t want to re-live the rough times, in hindsight, they also wouldn’t ask to have them taken away–the benefits are too great.  This new perspective helps them to see the opportunities for growth in their current situation.

A Way to Practice Gratitude

One of the easiest ways to practice gratitude is to keep a gratitude journal. At the end of the day, take some time to reflect on the day and what gave you joy.  What helped you to learn or grow? Did an interaction with someone give you a lift?  Were you able to help someone else? Perhaps, not all the events were positive, and look for the benefits in those as well. Maybe your flat tire gave you a chance to relax while you waited for CAA. Maybe you kept your cool during a conflict. Think about the seams of light in the darkness.

Once you have thought about the day, pick a few to write about.

The benefits of this practice are a change of perspective (as discussed above), as well as an increasing sense of awareness.  When we commit to this daily exercise, we start to be mindful of things we can be thankful for. As we practice, our gratitude grows.

Gratitude is an enhancement to life.

Now, one of the best gratitude songs of all time…Enjoy!  And Happy Thanksgiving!

 

 

 

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Happy Labour Day Weekend!

Here it is…the last long weekend of Summer 2018!  It’s the one we commonly refer to as “Labour Day”, but what does this mean?  According to this site on Canadian history, our current practice of recognizing Labour Day evolved from a massive working class demonstration in Toronto in 1872.  How far we’ve come from the day’s original roots!

Whatever your plans for this weekend…spending time with family and friends, getting kids ready to go back to school or catching your breath before the business of September hits; I wish you all a restful weekend.

 

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Happy Canada Day Weekend!

For those of us who live in Canada…Happy Canada Day weekend!

Whether you choose to celebrate with family, friends, good food (lots) or spending the time in quiet contemplation, I wish you a restful and enjoyable weekend.  See you next week.

 

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Rest and Relaxation

The temperature is rising.  The birds are singing.  Trees are budding, and spring flowers are blooming.  Welcome to the first long weekend of the summer (even if the beginning of summer is a month away)!  Hopefully Mother Nature cooperates making outside activities a possibility.

Whatever your plans, I wish you a restful and enjoyable weekend.  See you next week.

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Valentine’s Day! What Does it Mean to You?

Ah Valentine’s Day!  For some, it’s the most romantic day of the year…for others it’s the biggest ‘Hallmark Holiday’ of all time.  However, no matter where you fit on that continuum, February 14 can be an opportunity for you to create a personal experience of love, while avoiding the pitfalls that can accompany the day.

The Dark History of Valentine’s Day

Traditionally we may think of Valentine’s Day as a celebration of love, cute stuffed toys, kisses and chocolate; however, it’s beginnings were not so cozy.  According to a 2011 opinion piece presented on National Public Radio (US), the Romans had a lot to do with the creation of Valentine’s Day.

“From Feb. 13 to 15, the Romans celebrated the feast of Lupercalia. The men sacrificed a goat and a dog, then whipped women with the hides of the animals they had just slain.

The Roman romantics “were drunk. They were naked,” says Noel Lenski, a historian at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Young women would actually line up for the men to hit them, Lenski says. They believed this would make them fertile.

The brutal fete included a matchmaking lottery, in which young men drew the names of women from a jar. The couple would then be, um, coupled up for the duration of the festival — or longer, if the match was right.

The ancient Romans may also be responsible for the name of our modern day of love. Emperor Claudius II executed two men — both named Valentine — on Feb. 14 of different years in the 3rd century A.D. Their martyrdom was honored by the Catholic Church with the celebration of St. Valentine’s Day.”

There wasn’t a cupid in sight!

As time went on, through the 15th and 16th century works of Chaucer and Shakespeare, February 14 took on the more romantic tone that we recognize today.  In Britain and Europe, hand-make paper cards became part of the tradition during that time.

Modern Valentine’s Day

What about now?  How does an ordinary Canadian mark Valentine’s Day?

A 2016 Montreal Gazette article stated that in 2015, Canadians spent $3.3 billion on chocolate.  When we add in money spent on other gifts (flowers, jewelry) and dinners out, our bank accounts went down by an average of $177–all in aid of February 14.

Businesses appreciate this ‘love festival’ as there are no associated discounts associated as there are with Christmas (i.e. pre-holiday and Boxing Day sales).

This holiday is seen to be such a romantic day, that 10 percent of marriage proposals happen on Valentine’s Day!

What If I’m Single?

Traditionally, we think of Valentine’s Day as a celebration for couples.  But what if we’re un-coupled?  No worries!  Business has found a solution!  Thanks to the Canadian Association of Professional Cuddlers (CAPC), you can hire a professional cuddler to spend Valentine’s Day with.   Cuddling starts at $45 for 30 minutes and goes up to $155 for two hours. If you’re looking for skin-to-skin cuddling, there is an additional fee per hour.  Cuddlers are trained to ensure that everyone is safe and comfortable at all times.

Some single people will participate in Single Awareness Day–a celebration of the love of friends, family and self.  Individuals recognize the day by getting together with loved ones, buying themselves a gift and/or taking part in a favourite activity.

It appears that if you want to celebrate, there are many options.

Expectations…A Roadblock on the Road of Romance

Sometimes this ‘holiday of love’ isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.  Based on what I hear personally and professionally, Valentine’s Day can be a minefield…and I don’t mean the “Will you be mine” variety!  The problem comes down to expectations about how our partners should show their love.  However, there may be a solution.

Gary Chapman, in his 1995 book The Five Love Languages:  How to Express Heartfelt Commitment to Your Mate; outlines the five ways that we show and accept love from our significant other(s).  These are:  giving/receiving gifts, spending quality time, words of affirmation, acts of service (devotion) and physical touch.  When a couple doesn’t understand each other’s ‘love language’ hurt feelings can erupt.

Let’s look at Bob and Sue…Valentine’s Day is around the corner and Bob has dropped many (what he thinks are obvious) hints about his ideal gift (Kitchener Rangers tickets). Sue has decided that she will surprise Bob by taking their children to her parents home for an over-night visit and then making him a romantic dinner.  A clash is possible as Bob is looking forward to tickets, and Sue is imaging Bob’s appreciation and delight at all the work she has done to make Bob feel loved.

When we are part of a couple, it’s important to communicate with each other about our expectations–especially as these can change over time. If you’re curious about your ‘love language’, check out Dr. Chapman’s site and take the quiz.  It may be useful pre-Valentine’s Day activity!

Speaking of Communication…

Valentine’s Day can bring a lot of pressure to new relationships. What does my new person want? Will dinner out be too much?  Too little?  My last partner really loved jewelry, but is it too soon in this relationship?  What impression will my gift give?  Maybe I’ll just go out of town on February 14 and skip the entire thing!

What would happen if Valentine’s Day became an opportunity to have a meaningful conversation around expectations–what we like, what we don’t?  Is this something we want to celebrate as a couple?

I wonder how many hurt feelings and broken relationships could be avoided by having a simple conversation?

Despite all the buildup, February 14 is just another day on the calendar. No matter how you choose to spend it, I wish you love and your fair share of chocolate!

And now…some romance from Peanuts…Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

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Happy 2018! Do You Have a Theme?

When I was a pre-teen, I would spend New Year’s Eve with my grandmother.  She would sleep over to be with me and my younger sibling while our parents celebrated with friends.  For me, it was a highlight of the holiday season.  After everyone else was in bed, Nana and I would spend the evening watching TV–alternating between Guy Lombardo and Dick Clarke’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve.  At midnight, we’d “be” in Times Square watching the magic of the ball dropping and a new year beginning.

Snap Shots of Our Lives

Certain life stages often become equated with a particular event.  For some people, hearing a certain song will immediately transport them back to memories of a high school friend or their first summer job. For others, the smell of a favourite food reminds them of summers at a cottage or time spent in a grandparent’s kitchen.

Annual events, like New Year’s Eve, can lead us to revisit past times.  If you’re old enough to remember the more than a few opportunities that you brought in the new year, you can track your life stages by your memories.  Each stage has its own flavour–from being the child allowed to stay up and watch the ball drop, to the parties with friends or extended family, to sharing the event with the children in your life.  This is just one example.  Everyone has their own story.  Not all the chapters may be happy ones; in fact, some may be very painful–but they are our own personal stories, and looking back at them can provide insight into how we arrived to this place.

An Alternative to New Year’s Resolutions

Last year at this time, I wrote a post about the problems with setting New Year’s resolutions.  This year, I offer an alternative–The Annual Theme!

The idea behind having a theme is that it sets a course for the year, without tying us down to specific actions.  Instead of “thou shalt not”, we can be kinder to ourselves by choosing activities that fit into an area where we would like to focus.

An Example

One of the big resolutions that come up at this time is about losing weight.  If we follow the “resolution” way of working on this goal, we might banish junk food from our cupboards, hold ourselves to a strict gym schedule, and count fat grams and/or calories…we may even try the latest trendy diet.  Often, by the end of January we find ourselves to be tired, resentful and craving large doses of sugar, fat and salt. We are left feeling that we have failed yet another resolution, with a plan to try again next year.

But what if?….

Let’s take the same goal (losing weight), and instead of being fixed on this outcome, took a look at the bigger picture–health.  Maybe our motivation to lose weight is from a beauty perspective (and that’s ok, we all want to look good!), but for a lot of us, there is also a health component to this desire.  We want to feel better, be able to run up a flight of stairs or go for a walk without running out of breath.

If health becomes the theme for the year, then we look at all our decisions through that lens. By doing this, we change our actions because we are comparing possible outcomes of choices against improving our health.  Walk a block to the store or take the car?  Which will improve my health?  Eat the second piece of cake or walk away from the table?  How will this effect my health?

Over time, looking through the lens becomes easier and the choices second nature because we start to see how those small, daily choices reflect our annual theme.

Another Reasons Why a Theme is a Good Idea

When we set resolutions, we often spread ourselves very thin.  Sometimes we “resolve” to change every bad habit that we own.  We’re going to quit smoking, lose weight, get off the couch, rid our homes of clutter…the list is endless.  It takes a lot of energy trying to keep up with all those plans and activities.

When we pick a theme, we focus on one area–and then make individual choices–usually one at a time.  For this reason, I recommend not choosing more than two themes for the year.  If you are going to have more than one, it’s important that they can co-exist (for example, health and spending more time with family members).

This New Year’s Eve, I encourage you to take some time and think about the stages you’ve gone through as you’ve rung in the new year (past and present)–celebrating the joys and sorrows.

As I wish you all the best for 2018, here’s a slice of nostalgia from Guy Lombardo as he and his Royal Canadians rang in 1958…and New Year’s Rockin’ Eve 1974 (hosted by George Carlin)…Enjoy!

 

 

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My Wish for You This Season…

Not gold, nor myrrh, nor even frankincense
would I have for you this season,
but simple gifts, the ones that are hardest to find,
the ones that are perfect, even for those who have everything (if such there be).

I would (if I could) have for you the gift of courage,
the strength to face the gauntlets only you can name,
and the firmness in your heart to know that you (yes, you!)
can be a bearer of the quiet dignity that is the human glorified.

I would (if by my intention I could make it happen) have for you the gift of connection,
the sense of standing on the hinge of time,
touching past and future
standing with certainty that you (yes, you!) are the point where it all comes together.

I would (if wishing could make it so) have for you the gift of community,
a nucleus of love and challenge,
to convince you in your soul that you (yes, you!) are a source of light in a world too long believing in the dark.

Not gold, nor myrrh, nor even frankincense, would I have for you this season,
but simple gifts, the ones that are hardest to find,
the ones that are perfect,
even for those who have everything (if such there be).

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The Holidays are Coming! Do You Have a Plan?

As I write this, the weather has become colder, decorations are in store windows and the local grocery store has been playing carols since the day after Halloween.  Whatever your tradition:  Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa or Festivus, it’s becoming impossible to ignore the fact that the holidays are fast approaching.

While main-stream media perpetuates the idea of the holidays as a time of gift-giving, spending time with family and friends and eating beautifully prepared food; this is not the reality for many people.  For some people, financial difficulties may prevent them from buying the same number or type of gifts they were able to give in previous years.  For others, 2017 may have brought a change in family/relationship structures either through death, divorce or family members and/or friends moving away.  Even happy events such as the birth of a child or the addition of a new adult member into the family can lead to changes in previous holiday traditions.

Instead of anticipating the holidays with a sense of dread, how can we make the ‘season’ as peaceful as possible?

Consult and Plan Ahead

Once we recognize that not only is the festive season coming, but that it will be ‘different’ this year; having a plan for the holidays goes a long way to working through any potential rough spots.

Contrary to popular belief, traditions can adapt to deal with new circumstances.  However, consultation is key. If these traditions involve others, a sound idea is to have ‘the conversation’ before the event is looming. That way everyone is agreed on the new plan and has time to make necessary changes.   For example, Aunt Shirley may not be open to limiting the price of gifts to $10, if you tell her the week before Christmas, and she has already spent $100 on your gift.

Do Something Completely Different

Sometimes it can be fun to take a break from our traditions and do something completely different.  Rather than missing what isn’t there, we focus on doing something new.  Often families may choose to travel over the holiday season rather than be reminded of a loss–whether it’s  loved one, relationship, job, pet, etc.  Once they are through the ‘year of firsts’ they may return to their regular plans, but in the short-term creating a new plan is a way of getting through the ‘first holiday’.

If You Are Going To Be Alone, Take Advantage of the Holiday Buildup

In most traditions, the celebrations last for more than one day.  Let’s take Christmas for example.  While the main focus is usually on December 25th, many events start to happen anytime from mid-November onward.  If you know that you are going to be alone on “the day” (and this isn’t your first choice), get your fill of pre-December 25th events, and then plan a special day for yourself filled with activities that have special meaning for you.

Give Back

No matter your holiday tradition, one common factor is love for each other. This time of year provides many opportunities to give back to your community.  Volunteer at a shelter, visit seniors in retirement homes whose family members are unable to visit, offer to take care of a friend’s pet (who wasn’t invited to holiday celebrations)…the list is endless.

By lifting our eyes from our own situations, we have a wider view of the world and places where we can be helpful.

“Festivas for the Rest of Us!”

And now…Festivas!  Enjoy!  Warning…Seinfeld’s humour may not appeal to everyone.

 

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